Category Archives: Spring Boot

Thymeleaf and Spring Security

Thymeleaf is a popular templating engine, particularly with Spring projects. Spring Boot has chosen Thymeleaf as the view technology of choice, largely replacing the need for JSP. With old JSPs, custom tag libraries provided integration with various technologies, including Spring Security. A similar library exists to integrate Thymeleaf and Spring Security – the Thymeleaf Spring read more »

Spring Boot Actuator Trace: Logging HTTP requests

Spring Boot Actuator provides assistance for application monitoring. Out of the box it provides information on application health, configuration and logging. It’s trivial to enable: simply add the spring-boot-starter-actuator dependency to a Spring Boot project in Maven or Gradle and it just works! The monitoring information is provided as JSON from HTTP endpoints or via JMX.

The Spring Boot Actuator trace endpoint is particularly handy. By default it shows the last 100 HTTP requests made to the application. This article walks through an Actuator demo and shows some of the configuration options to get the best from this feature.

Spring Boot as a Windows Service

The documentation provided by Spring on deploying a Spring Boot application as a Windows Service is a little sparse. Indeed, here it is in full:

Spring Boot application can be started as Windows service using winsw.

A sample maintained separately to the core of Spring Boot describes step-by-step how you can create a Windows service for your Spring Boot application.

— From Spring Boot Reference Guide (version 1.4.3), section 56.2: Microsoft Windows Services

As the official reference guide is lacking detail, here is a step by step guide to building and deploying a Spring Boot application as a Windows Service.

Microservice discovery with Spring Boot and Eureka

One of the standard problems with Microservices Architecture is the issue of service discovery. Once we’ve decomposed our application into more than a handful of distinct microservices, it becomes difficult for every service to know the address of every service it depends on. Configuring dependencies from inside a microservice is impractical – it distributes configuration among all the microservices. It also violates the DRY principle – multiple microservice instances will need access to the same configuration settings. What’s more, it goes against the Dependency Injection design that’s supposed to be one of the benefits of the Microservices Architecture.

The standard solution is to delegate location of microservices to a new microservice. In keeping with the Single Responsibility Principle, this ‘discovery’ microservice is responsible for tracking the locations of all the other microservices and nothing else.

Netflix’s Eureka is an implementation of a discovery server and integration is provided by Spring Boot. Using Spring Boot, we can build a Eureka discovery server and have our microservices register with it.

RestTemplateBuilder and @RestClientTest in Spring Boot 1.4.0

Spring Boot 1.4.0 is now available. Among the enhancements are new mechanisms to build and test RestTemplates used to make calls to RESTful web services.

No code REST services with Spring Boot and Spring Data REST

CRUD REST services are the backbone of a microservice architecture. If we want to use microservices rather than monolithic applications, it’s essential that we can create a basic service with a minimum of effort. Spring Boot can be used to quickly create and deploy a new web service. Spring Data REST can be used to build out the REST interface based on a database entity model. Using both together allows us to create a running RESTful web service with zero custom Java code and no tricky XML.

This how-to describes how to build a RESTful web service as an executable JAR that provides CRUD operations against a single MySQL database table.